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Marathon Pacing Tattoos
GOING SOLO?
Temporary tattoos help stick your pace.
By Susan Rinkunas

PUBLISHED 09/15/2008

Don't have a moving support group? PaceTat, a temporary tattoo, lists every mile split for marathon finishing times from three to five hours. RW staffers tested the tats in July and found them durable and easy to read. Finish-line high-fives not included. pacetat.com, $3





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Runner's High!
Tuesday, November 4, 2008 at 8:53 PM
|  posted by Erin Kurdyla

Here I am in full marathon mode. I crossed the finish line in 3:39:18...another 42 seconds and I would have missed qualifying for Boston.

Phew! My Pace Tat temporary tattoo kept me on track throughout the race, plus, it looked pretty bad ass. Check out the shot of my forearm. It lists every mile split for marathon finishing times from three to five hours. If math is not your friend, you will be OBSESSED with this new toy ($3, pacetat.com). I can't imagine running another race (ahhhh, Boston!!!) without one. Post-race Mom, Dad and I cabbed it back to NJ where I took a long hot Epson salt bath, downed a Luna Sport Recovery Smoothie (Strawberry Banana is my fave) and then proceeded to eat an entire Kashi pizza, drink SEVERAL glasses of hard-earned wine and pass out by 9pm. I'm struggling with stairs today, but feeling good. Woo hoo!




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September 20, 2007
Pace Tattoos? Why Didn't WE Think of That!

Mark Remy

OK, this is pretty cool: A pace chart in the form of a temporary tattoo for your arm:


According to the company's web site, the things last for 3 to 5 days, unless you remove them with alcohol or baby oil before that. And at just 2 bucks a pop, they're cheap.

But wouldn't a permanent tattoo be so much more hard-core? Speaking of which: Do you have a cool or freaky running-related tat? Send us a photo!




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April 7, 2009
Updates To PaceTat Marathon Pacing Tattoo

Steve Speirs

The PaceTat Original pacing tattoo was designed to replace paper pace bracelets and has been around for at least a couple of years now. Features include a high contrast white background with large black text and numbers, making for an easy-to-read pacing chart located on the inside of your arm.

As good as the original design was, PaceTat have made a few improvements and now sell a couple of new products:
PaceTat 2.0 - is the update to the original PaceTat. Updated features include:

* Additional Finish Times
* Larger, easy-to-read text and numbers
* Mile splits with metric splits every 5 kilometers so that you can use PaceTat 2.0 in shorter races in addition to marathons
* Alternating background color to help differentiate each mile goal

PaceTat Miles - is the long awaited update with splits that are listed in miles only. PaceTat Miles gives you pacing information for every mile on the course in addition to the half-way point, 13.1 miles, and the finish, 26.2! New finish times have also been added as requested by many runners. There are now 20 different paces to choose from!

PaceTat pacing tattoos are easy to apply and will stay in place for a good 3-5 days. Product support is excellent and the company is always open to receiving feedback and ideas for new product updates.





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By EMILIE LE BEAU; McClatchy-Tribune
Published: 07/08/09  12:09 pm   |   Updated: 07/08/09  12:10 pm

You're running a race. If you've completed 10 miles in 1 hour and 47 minutes, will you finish the marathon within your goal of 3 hours and 53 minutes?

After running 10 miles, who has the required math skills to add, subtract and divide? Running is hard physical work and even simple equations are sometimes impossible to compute. But runners can still keep on schedule with a temporary tattoo that provides split times.

PaceTat Miles is a 6.5 inch temporary tattoo runners can affix to their forearm. Runners can choose between 20 finishing times and the tattoo lists the splits for each mile. A runner hoping to finish a marathon in 3 hours and 55 minutes, for example, will average a 8 minute and 58 second mile.

PaceTat also offers the PaceTat 2.0, which lists metric splits in kilometers. This provides finish times for runners in shorter races such as 8 or 10K. The PaceTat is available in 14 finishes times.

PaceTats can be removed after a race with baby oil or rubbing alcohol. Left alone, it will last three to five days.

Each PaceTat is $2.99. Available at PaceTat.com





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PaceTat - Marathon Pace Band Tattoo

In many of my previous marathons I’ve printed off and worn a wrist pace band to help achieve my time goals. It’s quite an easy thing to do - head on over to the Runner’s World web site, enter your target time & race distance and print the band. Once you’ve trimmed the sheet of paper to size you’re all set.

Unless you take the time to waterproof the band, you’ll often find it breaks before you even get to the finish line. Sometimes it’s uncomfortable on the wrist and sometimes you can’t even read the splits. Very frustrating!

PaceTatEnter the PaceTat - a durable transfer that’s applied to your arm. The text is easy to read and it’s comfortable to boot. PaceTat is a convenient way to stick to your pace on training runs and on race day. It’s very comfortable and won’t get in your way or chafe like the pace bands and home-made solutions.

How to use PaceTat:

1. Make sure your skin is clean and free of oils & makeup.

2. Remove clear, protective top sheet.

3. Press PaceTat firmly onto clean, dry skin with design facing down.

4. Hold wet cloth against back of PaceTat, press down and make sure to wet it thoroughly.

5. Wait 30 seconds - no need to rush! Peel away paper backing.

6. Gently rinse image with water for best results.

To ensure proper adhesion, allow PaceTat to dry for at least two hours before running.

Watch the video to clarify any points you’re unsure of:

Prices start at $2.00 each (perfect for race day!) or you can buy a pack of ten for $16.00 - a saving of $4.00 compared to buying them individually.

The only negative for me is that the finish times start at 3 hours 10 minutes. The last 5 or 6 marathons I’ve run have all been completed in under 3 hours, so the transfer would be of no use to me. I’m sure PaceTat could do something custom, but I really feel they should offer something off the shelf as it were.

Full marks to PaceTat for thinking outside the box though - great idea and sure to be winner at the races!





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A new way to time marathoners
Temporary tattoos replace the pacing bands used in running races.
FORTUNE Small Business Magazine
By Mina Kimes, FSB reporter
September 27 2007: 7:35 AM EDT

(FSB Magazine) -- Running a marathon is a lot like bringing a product to market - timing is everything. Graham Henshaw, a product-development engineer and marathoner from Chicago, grew tired of using a pacing band, a bracelet on which runners write data, to time training runs. He came up with an idea: Replace the bracelets with temporary tattoos.

Henshaw launched PaceTat (pacetat.com) in March, then moved to Washington, D.C., to market the product full-time. By late September he had sold 30,000 tattoos, which come in 12 versions for different paces.

Current Issue

Sold at running stores and marathons, they now brandish the logos of sponsors such as New Balance.




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Pace Tat: A New Twist on a Old Race Ritual

* Haliku
* Oct 2, 2008 at 5:39 AM
* 2 comments

If you have ever run in an organized race you might have noticed runners with a piece of paper, possibly laminated, taped around one of their wrists.  A newbie racer might ask one of these veterans what the paper loop is for thus realizing they wasted time memorizing their time vs. mileage pace.


A problem with the paper loop around the wrist is they often fall off, can be hard to read and are often uncomfortable to wear.  Unless waterproof they can also fall apart.  Carrying a list of times on a card isn’t the best option either as the same issues may exist and you might not have any pockets to stash it in during the race.


Recently I ran the Boulder Backroads Marathon and noticed a fellow runner with an obvious solution to the paper loop, a tattoo of his goal time vs. mileage.  I managed to ask him about it and have looked into the company since.


Pace Tat’s only product is temporary race pace tattoos for marathon runners (half or full) in all the Boston qualifying times.  They have 14 pacer tattoos that cover from 1:30/3:00 hours to 2:30/5:00 finish times.


It appears that Susan Rinkunas of Runner’s World has a review in the current issue so the word is out:

“Don't have a moving support group? PaceTat, a temporary tattoo, lists every mile split for marathon finishing times from three to five hours. RW staffers tested the tats in July and found them durable and easy to read. Finish-line high-fives not included.”


If only they could make a tattoo for the ultra running community…




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There Had to Be a Better Way

October 1, 2008 by Jacquie 
Filed under General, Running Accessories

Leave a comment

That’s what the founder, Graham Henshaw of PaceTat said which ultimately led to the brilliant invention of what is known as PaceTat.  Runners that have been training hard to reach a goal time for their marathon can’t do without one of these.

pacetat As the name implies, PaceTat is a removable tattoo that helps to keep marathon runners on pace during the marathon so that they can finish within their goal time. PaceTat (as pictured)  measures 1-1/2″ wide by 6-1/4″ long gets tattooed to the underside of your forearm.  The removable tattoo is made with 100% FDA approved ingredients, so should be safe for your skin.  PaceTat has made it easier than ever to keep check on your times during the race.  And it gives both mile splits as well as kilometer splits.  Need this kind of guidance for a half marathon?  Just cut it in half.

There’s no issue about the comfort as it’s part of your skin.  Easy to take off with baby oil or rubbing alcohol after your marathon, but will easily last for a few days on your arm just in case you are thinking about back to back marathons.

It’s my goal to one day qualify to run the Boston Marathon.  It will take discipline and training on my part, but I will definitely be sporting a PaceTat as part of my running kit in my attempt to reach my goal.




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Washington, D.C.-based PaceTat offers on-skin advertising in the form of pacing guides. Pacing guides are used by runners in marathons and races to help them maintain the speed needed to finish a race within their goal time. Existing solutions include paper or plastic bracelets, which have a tendency to chafe and get in the way. PaceTat offers a comfortable and easy to read alternative: pacing guides transferred directly onto the skin of the forearm, like a temporary tattoo.

What's interesting for marketers is the branding opportunity: PaceTat offers custom branded versions for advertisers. PaceTat's pacing guides present marketers with a unique canvas for conveying a message that literally sticks with the consumer until it’s washed off. The company, which was founded earlier this year, has already sold over 30,000 branded pacing guides. (They picked a desirable audience, too. In the US, the running market is notable for its median household income of roughly USD 113,000, according to Runner's World.)

PaceTat isn’t currently offering franchising or partnering arrangements, but the concept should inspire advertising mavens to find other methods of ‘skinvertising’. As a marketer, you know you're doing something right if consumers merge your brand with their own self-image. If they actually tattoo your logo directly onto their skin? Well, it doesn't get much better than that. ;-) Related: Advertising after dark—branded nightclub hand stamps.

Website: www.pacetat.com
Contact: info@pacetat.com




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Pace Tat is Genius

07 Oct

Posted by admin as Run

Have you ever seen something and know right away it is genius? Well, folks this happened to me today when I saw the web site for PaceTat, where I will be placing an order in tne next few days. I guess you want to know what PaceTat is after that sort of introduction.

Here are the words from company themselves on PaceTat - PaceTat is a durable transfer that is applied to your arm displaying all of your marathon and 1/2 marathon pace information and If you don’t remove PaceTat with alcohol or baby oil, it will stay on for 3-5 days

I think the only way to really explain PaceTat is an image and I will not say anymore, it explains itself




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SCORE Helps Entrepreneur Pick Up The Pace

Graham Henshaw has been a runner most of his life. But the founder and CEO of Adhesion LLC had the idea for his newest product—PaceTat ™-- while he has watching a race.  Henshaw explains, “As a runner, I was frustrated with the paper pace bracelets that were distributed to runners to help pace themselves during a race.  Then, last year, I was a spectator at a race and I realized that everybody struggled with the old product and decided to design something better.”

The result was PaceTat, a 1.5” x 6.5” durable transfer that adheres directly to a runner’s arm and clearly displays pacing goals.  PaceTat has another major advantage as far as race organizers are concerned:  PaceTat provides advertisers with a new way to reach an attractive, upscale audience.  With the advertising, race organizers are often able to offer PaceTat to runners for free (versus the usual runner-direct price of $2.50.)

With product development complete, Henshaw decided to go to SCORE, a national not-for-profit association of successful business executives.  From offices located all over the Chicago area, these multi-discipline business professionals provide free one-on-one counseling, teach low-cost business workshops and supply other resources to entrepreneurs and small businesses.

Mitchell Morris became Henshaw’s lead counselor, and together they went to work analyzing his business and opportunities.  They dug into the financials to look at sales trends, product pricing and profitability.  They discussed existing and potential target markets and ways to reach them.  Morris reviewed drafts of his business plan.  Since much of Henshaw’s business was over the internet, Morris also brought in counselor Peg Corwin to analyze and make suggestions to improve his website and Google Adwords ads.

“I am a mechanical engineer by training with a background in new product development.   One aspect of engineering is knowing where to find the right information and I knew that I would need to seek sound business advice as I moved forward.  SCORE is the place where I can go to find the answers to many of the questions that I’ve come across in starting and running this business.”

After more than 10 sessions over a five-month period with Morris and Corwin at SCORE’s downtown Chicago office, the business is now growing steadily.  As Henshaw describes it, “We started working with the business plan and then refined the marketing plan.  But most of all Peg and Mitch helped me by getting me to focus and decide the business model I am going to use.”

Within 2 months PaceTat was the star of the Frederick (MD) Marathon Expo. Hundreds of people purchased the product at the expo and gave it rave reviews in surveys completed after the race.  Then the Chicago Marathon and New Balance Shoes bought more than 10,000 PaceTats for distribution at the Chicago Marathon Expo.  Since that success many other races and sponsors have expressed interest in PaceTat, both as a runner’s tool and advertising medium.

Adhesion LLC is now launching it’s second product, Life Drive ™, a tiny USB drive that clips to an athlete’s clothing and contains emergency contact and relevant medical information. The information can be accessed by EMT’s or doctors in the case of an accident.  With continuing support from SCORE, Graham hopes to develop and market more innovative products for athletes in the future.

Morris attributes Henshaw’s success to an original idea and hard work :  “Graham has been successful because of the uniqueness of PaceTat and because he has the drive necessary to constantly make contacts and sales presentations.”

Should you take up racing and need to keep a pace, you can purchase pacetat at http://www.pacetat.com/   Should you need help developing and marketing your product, set up an appointment with a SCORE counselor at www.scorechicago.org.




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Great idea! PaceTat

I just finished browsing through my weekly Springwise Newsletter and took note of a great new product. PaceTat is a durable transfer that is applied to a runner's arm displaying all of their marathon and 1/2 marathon pace information. As Springwise states: Existing solutions include paper or plastic bracelets, which have a tendency to chafe and get in the way. PaceTat offers a comfortable and easy to read alternative: pacing guides transferred directly onto the skin of the forearm, like a temporary tattoo. In addition, PaceTat provides a medium to apply an event brand logo.

So, a great idea if you're planning or organizing a race. But I really think that this idea can branch out beyond marathons. Perhaps a bit out there, but you could have program-tats so guests don't have to carry around printed programs all night. This might also be applicable if planning a major sporting event where guests can wander around the site (like a car race). Any other ideas?




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Friday, August 31, 2007
PaceTat offers on-skin advertising in the form of pacing guides
Washington, D.C.-based PaceTat offers on-skin advertising in the form of pacing guides. Pacing guides are used by runners in marathons and races to help them maintain the speed needed to finish a race within their goal time. Existing solutions include paper or plastic bracelets, which have a tendency to chafe and get in the way. PaceTat offers a comfortable and easy to read alternative: pacing guides transferred directly onto the skin of the forearm, like a temporary tattoo.

What's interesting for marketers is the branding opportunity: PaceTat offers custom branded versions for advertisers. PaceTat's pacing guides present marketers with a unique canvas for conveying a message that literally sticks with the consumer until it’s washed off. The company, which was founded earlier this year, has already sold over 30,000 branded pacing guides. (They picked a desirable audience, too. In the US, the running market is notable for its median household income of roughly USD 113,000, according to Runner's World.)

PaceTat isn’t currently offering franchising or partnering arrangements, but the concept should inspire advertising mavens to find other methods of ‘skinvertising’. As a marketer, you know you're doing something right if consumers merge your brand with their own self-image. If they actually tattoo your logo directly onto their skin? Well, it doesn't get much better than that. ;-) Related: Advertising after dark—branded nightclub hand stamps.

Website [Content Related to Website] : www.pacetat.com





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I want this!  In my current state, (23 weeks and counting!) I am in no shape to be thinking about running half marathons again, but still!  I’m trying to get ready for post baby motivation.  I can hardly wait to start running again and get that high that only comes from a good long run.

This is the coolest thing to help you keep on track for your ultimate goal time in your next race.  It is called pacetat.  Check it out!  It is just a simple and inexpensive tatoo that you can put on your arm to help you monitor how you are doing on your quest for a PR.  I wish I would have thought of this!




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PaceTat the perfect tool for qualifying for the Boston Marathon

Do you remember carrying a piece of paper with split times to help you keep on track for a race goal? Of course the paper would get wet and the ink on the paper would smear or disappear.

Later, a pace wrist band came out that you could use to keep you on track. The only problem was the writing was so small you would have to stop running and squint to see if you were on track.

Now a new company called PaceTat has created a temporary tattoo that you wear on your arm with split times for half marathon and marathon distances. The tattoo is water resistant and is easily removed with rubbing alcohol or baby oil.

Learn more about PaceTat and keep your goal pace with you as you run.




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This is so cool!  Just found via the Austin-based RunTex blog:

"Neatest new running gizmo: The Pacetat. They are six-inch long marathon or half-marathon pace tables that are tattooed onto your forearm for easy reference during a race. The ‘tats are easily removed with rubbing alcohol or baby oil and/or just fade away on their own after three or four days. They cost $2 apiece (or 10 for $16). For more info, go to www.pacetat.com.  If you want a more permanent one, plenty of ink shops on 6th Street will gladly help."

That's some hardcore ink!  I've been looking to print out some pace table to wear around my wrist for reference during the Chicago Marathon, but this is way better!  I just ordered me 2 x 3:15 pacetats... just in case I blow up big time during Chicago (probable), I'll have a spare to wear for my next BQ try.




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By Michelle Laczkoski, DAILY NEWS STAFF
GHS
Posted Apr 19, 2009 @ 12:14 AM

The original essentials for runners - a pair of sneakers and a digital watch - have been left in the dust by recent technology.

Using high-tech gadgets and equipment, runners in the Boston Marathon tomorrow can be seen simultaneously running to music, tracking their pace with temporary tattoos and gulping down a small snack during the trek from Hopkinton to Boston.

Mario Fraioli, store manager of PR Running in Westborough, said both novice and veteran runners are using modern technology to enhance their performance.

"Among the new marathoners, who don't really know what they're getting into, these things are almost essentials," he said. "More experienced marathoners, who have had trouble in the past, are experimenting a little bit more and finding it does make a difference."

Locals participating in this year's Marathon say they sometimes use sophisticated devices, but also prefer basic gear.

Milford resident Peter Scandone, who has run six marathons, trains without what most runners consider an essential: an iPod.

"I don't like the wires dangling around," said Scandone, who is 60.

Runners annoyed by ear buds and long wires can solve the problem with the newest wireless headpieces called iMuffs.

The device, which comes in either black or white, operates on Bluetooth, meaning the music can be transmitted without wires. An adapter plugs into an iPod. The wraparound headphones also have controls on the earpiece.

The headphones, listed on www.wi-gear.com, cost $129.99.

Many runners, such as Kathryn Bett of Upton, wear a basic watch to track time.

With new technology, a watch can do much more than display hours and minutes.

Popular GPS units, most commonly found in wristwatches made by Garmin, are a new craze among runners, said Fraioli.

"It picks up satellite signals and gives you an accurate report of how far you've run, at what pace. You can plug in settings to show how many calories burned," he said. "It's a wealth of information."

The data can be wirelessly downloaded to a computer after a run, he said.

The watches can cost as much as $300.

"They're pretty pricey, so they're not for everyone," he said. "For the people who value that type of information, they're a great tool to see how far you've progressed from week to week."

A less expensive option is the Nike Plus program, which synchronizes iPods to a small chip placed in a sneaker. The chip tracks distance, pace, time and calories burned. Fraioli said it's less accurate than a GPS unit, but more affordable, retailing at around $40.

Another way to track a runner's pace is to transform a temporary tattoo, called Pace Tat, onto the forearm. It allows runners to stay on track and finish a marathon at a goal time. The tattoo lists every mile for marathon finishing times from three to five hours.

The temporary tattoos sell on PaceTat.com for $3.

In addition to her watch, Bett will rely on the energy supplement, Sports Beans, to fuel her toward the finish line tomorrow .

Bett, 44, carries a handful of the energizing jelly beans on a fuel belt with some small bottles of water.

The beans boost energy and "are easier to eat and digest than a power bar," said Bett, who ran in the Marine Corps Marathon about a decade ago.

"There's a lot of variety out there, it's hard to figure out what's the best one," she said. "You have to experiment."

Brooke Hagenbuch, 20, of Westborough, also depends on the "endurance beans," which contain electrolytes, carbohydrates and vitamins B and C.

"I eat them to give me energy and refuel my body," said Hagenbuch, who is running her first Marathon. "They're great for my long runs, like 16 miles or more."

Medway High School senior Amy Tortorello relies on sports gels, such as Gu.

"I think they give me more energy," said Tortorello, 18. "You can tell they give you a bit of a boost, I don't know if it's just mental, but it helps me."

Tortorello said she slurps an orange or chocolate flavored packet, which contains 20 milligrams of caffeine, before a run and then again one hour into the workout.

Fraioli said Gu is so popular at the running store, many customers buy the energy supplement by the case.

A case of 24 packets sells for $30, he said.

Laura Lehane sticks to more traditional snacks.

"I eat oranges as I'm running," said the 28-year-old Marlborough resident.

As far as gear, Lehane prefers Nike's Dri-Fit line.

"It's great because it keeps you warm and also pulls the sweat away from the body," she said.

Hagenbuch has trained in Adidas' Supernova track pants. The material is made with breathable material and also helps with muscle support, according to the sports company's Web site.

"Running in cotton is bad. It absorbs all of your sweat and becomes heavy. (The Adidas Supernova line) is light and lets your skin breathe," Hagenbuch said. "I have a whole outfit, and I'm planning to wear it for Marathon day."

While training for the Marathon with his niece, Erika Dibona, Scandone wears the popular sports performance apparel Under Armour.

"It's the best there is," he said.

Michelle Laczkoski can be reached at mlaczkos@cnc.com or 508-634-7556.